Tag Archive: Banksia


Haiku: Sentinels

I took this photograph at the Yellagonga Regional Park; as those who regularly read my blog know, this is a favourite place of mine to walk and photograph.  I have been laying low this past week; believe it or not, I have a novel on the boil; although I have only recently made my way back to it, putting it on the back burner, as I often do with many things I start ( I think they call it procrastination, correct me if I’m wrong)….

I love birds, particularly Australian Cockatoos.  Pink and Grey Galahs are prevalent across Australia.  They are also known as the Rose-breasted Cockatoo (Eolophus roseicapilla).  Unfortunately, not all of our Cockatoos are as prevalent.  I have attempted to photograph the Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris); sadly this endemic, Western Australian bird is endangered.  This grand bird has a  wingspan of up to 110cm, and can weigh around 520 – 790g (large for a Cockatoo).  It is endemic to the South-West of Western Australia, as it feeds predominantly on native proteaceous plant seeds, such as Banksia, Hakea and Grevillea, and secondarily on seeds from myrtaceous plants such as Eucalyptus and Corymbia.   Major threats to Carnaby’s Cockatoo include clearing of their feeding and breeding areas for housing, destruction of nesting hollows (people using logs for firewood), competition with other species for nesting hollows, and illegal poaching (they are a big-ticket item on the black market).  There are 13 species of Cockatoos in Australia.

I wrote a haiku for this photo I took of the Pink and Grey Galahs I love, although they are prevalent, they are still special.

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A BEE STING

I haven’t posted anything for ages, here is another poetry installment!  A silly one at that…. 🙂  I took this photograph at Yellagonga Regional Park in spring.  There is nothing deep and meaningful about this poem; I wrote it a few years ago in jest, after a mishap with a honey bee of the stinging kind.  Some facts about Australian Bees: we have around 1500 native bees in Australia.  Ten of these species are stingless, the rest can sting, although they are not aggressive, and relatively small, so their sting is usually not too much of a worry.  Unfortunately the most commonly known bee in Australia is not native (Apis mellifera); it is the common yellow-brown commercial honey bee.  European pioneers  introduced this bee in 1822 to produce honey for food (these bees are aggressive and real stingers).  Australian native bees don’t produce enough honey for commercial use. They pollinate particular Australian native plants; although stingless bees are efficient pollinators of macadamias and blue banded bees show potential as pollinators of greenhouse tomatoes  (http://www.aussiebee.com.au/croppollination.html).  These particular bees I have photographed are Australian native bees, pollinating Banksia flowers.  Australian stinging bees can sting repeatedly, unlike the European honey bee, which only gets one chance at stinging before it dies.