Tag Archive: Animals


Summers Night

I wrote this poem a while ago and posted it without a photograph;  I attached it to this photo I took in Kenya.  I used this photo earlier as well, to portray an acrostic poem I wrote.  Sort of like mixing and matching…

Summers night

 

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Lament of Discontent

I wrote this poem back in 2000.  It is tongue in cheek humour, that I carry with me readily…. I believe we need to have a good old laugh at ourselves sometimes; particularly when feeling sorry for oneself for very little reason!  I do it regularly, and go back to this poem for regular visits, to give myself a good kick in the pants!  This photo I took of the pelican at Monkey Mia about six months ago seems rather apt!  He or she was rather stroppy with me for getting a little too close, and pretty much chucked a sad at me!  I found it rather hilarious, to say the least!

Lament of Discontent

Haiku: Water Dragon

I haven’t written a haiku for a long time, so here it is; once again a photograph taken by my husband Paul!

Water dragon

Memoirs

I wrote this poem a couple of days ago; the photo my husband took of the meerkat looking through the window pane seemed apt!

Memoirs

Imagination

It has been a full week since I have posted anything. We are all caught up in the whirlwind of life at times; work, family, friends.  Sometimes it’s nice to just sit down and breathe.  I just had one of these moments to sit and THINK!  I went through photos from our Melbourne (Australia) trip.  We had the chance to see our son, daughter in law and grandson (man it makes me feel old, saying grandson, and I’m not even 50 yet!)  We went to the Melbourne zoo; and although I’m not particularly fond of zoos, it was a lovely family outing.  I just scribbled this poem, and found that this photo my husband took was very well suited.  The beautiful ape sitting, having a snack and contemplating, really moved me.

Imagination

Eternal Story

I wrote this poem yesterday, I attached it to a photo I took in the Yellagonga Regional Park of a crow, they are rather daunting looking birds, particularly in a bush land setting.

Eternal story

Poetry in Motion

This is another foursome; poems I have already posted individually in the past. The theme, ‘Poetry in Motion’ seems apt. Wildlife are poetry waiting to happen, just as children are. Two of these photos were taken by our dear friend, David Friend, in Zambia. I think I have mentioned him in the past. David is an aide worker in Zambia, he has been working as a doctor/surgeon in Africa for over 15 years now voluntarily. He is one of the most humble, generous human beings I know.  Anyone can donate to his cause whenever they like, by going to his webpage:

http://friendsmedicaltrust.co.nz/

There is also a Youtube video showing the work he does http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv6BDSYUo9w

Poetry in motion

Liberty

This short poem has been attached to a photo my husband Paul took in Thailand, of water buffalo at the Tiger Temple. I love that they were enjoying the cool water on a balmy Thai summer’s day.

Liberty

Australia

I have written a haiku attached to another photo I took at Monkey Mia. Emus traipse around the grounds, and saunter along the beach, enjoying the sunshine and the company of people holidaying in this absolutely beautiful place; I love my country!
Australia

I connected this haiku I wrote to a photo that was taken on the 2009 trip we made to Patuet, in South Sudan.  I don’t know who in our team took this photo.  It could have been either Dr Ian Everitt or photographer extraordinaire, Bena Wandei.  I love the way the photograph depicts the livestock farming in the tropical wet and dry climate of South Sudan.  Temperatures are high throughout the year, with a dry season from November to March and a wet season from April to October.  The wet season arouses the earth, the country side becomes alive; yet the water and the earth are quickly dried up with the onset of the somewhat shorter dry season. South Sudan’s major water resources are the Nile (White and Blue Nile) and its tributaries, and aquifers. A large part of South Sudan is covered by wetlands at favourable times of the year.  We were in Patuet in late February, the hottest and driest time of the year.  The shepherds still herd their goats, sheep and cattle; nothing much grows this time of year, fresh fruit and vegetables are non-existent.  The well is the only local water available, the water tank dries up quickly.  The hot, dry conditions trigger seasonal human and livestock migration to more permanent water sources (the toic), which serve as dry season grazing pasture, and for some ethnic groups, such as the Dinka, they also serve as fishing grounds.  The people  living in Patuet are of the Nuer tribe, they are predominantly cattle herders.